PCV Theory Test: The Road

There are 117 PCV theory test The Road questions. You must get 85% (99 out of 117) to pass the test. You may review answers after each question by clicking the 'check answer' button or you can wait until the end of the test for your final score. Good luck!

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PCV Theory Test: The Road Quick View

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A The air pressure will increase
B The brake pedal will become stiff
C The brakes will be less effective
D The brakes will work better
Correct Answer: C The brakes will be less effective
Explanation: Whenever you brake, the brakes convert the moving energy of your vehicle into heat. Continuous use of the brakes, particularly from high speed or on long steep descents, can cause the shoes and drums to overheat. This will make them less effective and, in some cases, they may not work at all.
A A risk of grounding
B Fallen trees
C Poor visibility
D Steep gradients
Correct Answer: B Fallen trees
Explanation: In severe weather conditions, you should be aware of the dangers of fallen trees or damaged branches that may fall on your vehicle. Be prepared in case a fallen tree is lying across the road just around a bend.
A The effect of strong side wind
B The overhanging bridge cables
C The swaying of the bridge
D The width of the lanes
Correct Answer: A The effect of strong side wind
Explanation: On exposed bridges, the wind can be particularly strong. If the bridge has two lanes, one may be closed in windy conditions to act as a buffer lane. In severe conditions, these bridges are often closed to high-sided vehicles, caravans and motorcycles.
A There isn't enough tread on your tyres
B There's a leak in the power-steering pump
C There's ice or frost on the road
D Your tyres are losing pressure
Correct Answer: C There's ice or frost on the road
Explanation: When you're in a warm cab, you may not notice the drop in outside temperature. One of the first signs of an icy road is a lack of 'feel' in the steering. If this happens, slow down and increase the distance between your vehicle and the one in front.
A Check ahead and then your nearside mirror
B Check behind for fast traffic in the right-hand lane
C Signal left, then check your mirror
D Wait for the other driver to flash their headlights
Correct Answer: A Check ahead and then your nearside mirror
Explanation: Never return to the left-hand lane until you're sure that you're well clear of the vehicle you've just overtaken. Don't cut in too soon and don't rely on the other driver flashing you in. Make your own judgement about when it's safe to move into the left-hand lane.
A Be prepared to stop in good time
B Sound the horn and flash headlights
C Stop before the zigzag lines
D Wave pedestrians across the road
Correct Answer: A Be prepared to stop in good time
Explanation: Always keep your speed down as you approach a zebra crossing. This will allow you to stop safely if necessary. Look well ahead for anyone about to reach the crossing or waiting to cross.
A In contraflow systems
B In service areas
C On exposed sections
D When passing signs
Correct Answer: C On exposed sections
Explanation: Motorways often have exposed sections of road, placing high-sided vehicles at risk in side wind. When there are extremes of weather, listen to and watch out for weather forecasts. That way, you can plan your journey for the safest time, or make a decision on whether you should travel at all.
A Across suspension bridges
B Along country lanes
C Through road tunnels
D Up steep hills
Correct Answer: A Across suspension bridges
Explanation: In windy weather, try to avoid routes where you would have to drive across suspension bridges and other exposed stretches of road. Plan a route that takes you across lower ground and where you'll be less exposed.
A Brake very sharply
B Ease off the accelerator
C Increase your speed
D Steer towards the centre line
Correct Answer: B Ease off the accelerator
Explanation: In wet conditions, water can build up between your tyres and the road surface. This is known as aquaplaning and it will cause your vehicle to slide. Try to regain control by easing off the accelerator to gradually lose speed. Don't brake or steer until your tyres are gripping the road again.
A The drivers may be drunk
B There are more of them
C They can park without lights
D They're more likely to move off
Correct Answer: C They can park without lights
Explanation: Vehicles below 2500 kg laden weight may park without lights on roads with a speed limit no greater than 30 mph. In dark streets, you may not be able to see them clearly.
A Move out and accelerate hard
B Move out slowly
C Pull out before the vehicle reaches the junction
D Wait until the vehicle starts to turn in
Correct Answer: D Wait until the vehicle starts to turn in
Explanation: Try to anticipate the actions of other road users. When you're waiting at a junction, don't emerge until you're sure of their intentions; their signals might be misleading.
A Only lorries and buses are allowed to use that lane
B There's a long uphill gradient ahead
C There's a steep downhill section ahead
D Vehicles fitted with speed limiters must use that lane
Correct Answer: B There's a long uphill gradient ahead
Explanation: Where a motorway has a long or steep gradient, slow-moving large vehicles might get in the way of other traffic. To help the traffic flow, an extra lane - called a crawler lane - is sometimes found on these gradients. This helps the traffic to flow by providing the slower heavy vehicles with a dedicated lane on the left.
A Its alarm may be activated
B Sunlight reflecting off the car windscreen
C The driver's door may suddenly open
D The narrow pavement on the right
Correct Answer: C The driver's door may suddenly open
Explanation: You don't know what the driver of this car will do. Be prepared for any hazard. The driver may not have seen you. Planning ahead will allow you to be in the correct gear and at the correct speed to cope if this hazard develops.
A Park underneath a street lamp
B Put a traffic cone behind your vehicle
C Switch off all lights
D Use the parking lights
Correct Answer: D Use the parking lights
Explanation: Large vehicles are required by law to use parking lights when parked at night, unless in a designated off-road parking area. Also, unless you're in a one-way street, you must only park on the left-hand side. It's generally much better to park off-road if you can, particularly if you're going to be stationary for a long period of time.
A When you're cornering
B When you're loading
C When you're overtaking
D When you're reversing
Correct Answer: A When you're cornering
Explanation: You must take extra care when your vehicle is carrying a load. When cornering, weight will be transferred away from the direction in which you're turning. Also, when you're braking, weight can be transferred in several different directions.
A More braking effort will be required
B Stopping distances will be decreased
C The load will be more stable
D The vehicle will use more fuel
Correct Answer: A More braking effort will be required
Explanation: Always plan ahead and take note of gradient warning signs. On downhill gradients, you can help control your vehicle's speed and avoid brake fade by selecting a lower gear in good time.
A When coming to contraflow systems
B When driving on motorways
C When travelling empty
D When turning at tight junctions
Correct Answer: D When turning at tight junctions
Explanation: When driving a long vehicle around corners, it's sometimes necessary to adopt a different road position to avoid mounting the kerb or colliding with street furniture such as lampposts or traffic signs. Other road users may not understand what you intend to do next. Watch them carefully and always signal in good time.
A Always keep to your intended route
B Anticipate how the weather may affect other road users
C Maintain a constant speed in exposed areas
D Stay close to smaller or vulnerable vehicles as you overtake them
Correct Answer: B Anticipate how the weather may affect other road users
Explanation: Cyclists, motorcyclists, caravans and high-sided vehicles can be very vulnerable in high winds. Plan well ahead and consider the difficulties they may be having. Remember, some routes may be closed to certain vehicles and you may need to use an alternative route.
A Motorway underpasses
B Narrow country lanes
C Open roads
D Slip roads
Correct Answer: C Open roads
Explanation: You should take account of the weather forecast when you plan your route. You're most likely to be subjected to side wind on exposed routes; for example, on long bridges, open roads and exposed stretches of motorway.
A In dead ground
B In road tunnels
C On high-level roads
D On ring roads
Correct Answer: C On high-level roads
Explanation: Listen to the weather forecast and plan your route to avoid exposed or high-level roads if windy weather is expected.
Correct Answer: B
Explanation: The car is the most stable of the vehicles shown. However, all vehicles are affected by side wind and buffeting from larger vehicles. Be aware that your speed and road position could cause unnecessary turbulence when passing smaller vehicles.
22. What's a buffer lane? Mark one answer
A A lane for overtaking safely
B A lane to park in until the wind drops
C A safety lane for vehicles blown off course
D The only lane to be used in high winds
Correct Answer: C A safety lane for vehicles blown off course
Explanation: During high winds, one of the lanes on a high bridge might be closed to traffic to create a buffer lane. The buffer lane is kept free to prevent vehicles from being blown into the path of other road users in the next lane. The closure of this lane may cause traffic congestion and delay.
A In built-up areas
B In roadworks
C On country roads
D On high-level bridges
Correct Answer: D On high-level bridges
Explanation: Buffer lanes are often found in places that are frequently subjected to high winds. Examples include high-level bridges, high-level roads, exposed viaducts and exposed stretches of motorway. Listen to the weather forecast, which should tell you of any need to re-plan your route.
A When it's foggy
B When it's icy
C When it's raining
D When it's windy
Correct Answer: D When it's windy
Explanation: A buffer lane is used when the wind begins to cause a risk to high-sided vehicles. At other times, it will be a normal lane. Don't use the buffer lane unless your vehicle has been blown off course into the lane, or you need to use it to avoid an incident or collision.
A Drive in your vehicle's lowest gear
B Drive slowly, in a higher gear than normal
C Keep the engine revs high and slip the clutch
D Keep the engine revs high and spin the wheels
Correct Answer: B Drive slowly, in a higher gear than normal
Explanation: Driving slowly will give you better control of your vehicle. By using a high gear, you reduce the chance of your wheels spinning and skidding on the snow.
Correct Answer: D A motorcycle
Explanation: The lighter the vehicle, the more likely it is to be affected by the buffeting from your vehicle in windy weather. Give motorcyclists and cyclists extra room when you overtake them, as your vehicle's draught can easily upset their control and balance.
A The buffeting effect
B The tyre noise
C Your engine noise
D Your exhaust smoke
Correct Answer: A The buffeting effect
Explanation: Give them plenty of room. Watch carefully in your nearside mirror, as the high winds and the buffeting effect from your vehicle may blow them off course.
A They may be blown into your path
B They may leave at the next exit
C They may position to turn right
D They may suddenly stop on the hard shoulder
Correct Answer: A They may be blown into your path
Explanation: On motorways, there are often exposed stretches of road where vulnerable vehicles can be affected by side wind. A gust of wind can even blow a motorcyclist out of their lane. Try to anticipate how the wind may affect others and give them plenty of room.
A Car drivers towing caravans
B Coach drivers
C Lorry drivers
D Tractor drivers
Correct Answer: A Car drivers towing caravans
Explanation: emember that the buffeting caused by large vehicles can affect other road users, including
  • cars towing caravans
  • motorcyclists.

A Drivers of emergency vehicles
B Drivers of low-loaders
C Drivers of tankers
D Drivers towing caravans
Correct Answer: D Drivers towing caravans
Explanation: Caravans are relatively light but have a large surface area. This makes them vulnerable to the turbulence created by large vehicles travelling at speed. The blast of air can destabilise the caravan, causing it to snake, and in extreme cases they can be blown over.
A To check that it's properly adjusted
B To check your road position
C To see if other vehicles have been affected
D To see if the rider is in control of their motorcycle
Correct Answer: D To see if the rider is in control of their motorcycle
Explanation: You must check the nearside mirror during and after overtaking a motorcyclist. Make sure that the rider is still in control and that your vehicle's draught hasn't caused them to lose their balance.
A Curtain-sided vehicles
B Front-wheel-drive vehicles
C Slow-moving vehicles
D Track-laying vehicles
Correct Answer: A Curtain-sided vehicles
Explanation: In very windy conditions, certain types of vehicle can be blown off course. These include box vans, curtain-siders, caravans and motorcycles. Make allowances for how the wind might affect these vehicles, especially if you're overtaking.
A Across viaducts
B In cuttings
C Passing large signs
D Through tunnels
Correct Answer: A Across viaducts
Explanation: On motorways, be especially careful when driving over bridges and viaducts. The road here is exposed and in windy weather there's a risk of strong side wind, which may blow you off course or even blow your vehicle over. In severe windy weather, these routes are often closed to drivers of high-sided vehicles.
A Other vehicles will have their lights on
B The road may still be slippery
C Vehicles may be parked on the hard shoulder
D Wet roads may cause more buffeting
Correct Answer: B The road may still be slippery
Explanation: Rain, combined with oil, rubber particles, dirt and debris on the road surface, reduces the tyres' grip on the road. It can be especially slippery when it rains after a long dry spell.
A To avoid puncturing the tyres
B To avoid splashing pedestrians
C To improve their view around the bend
D To reduce the risk of skidding
Correct Answer: D To reduce the risk of skidding
Explanation: Drain covers usually have a metal surface. When wet, these covers are slippery and can cause a motorcycle to skid; be prepared for riders to avoid them.
A Five times the normal distance
B The normal distance
C Three times the normal distance
D Twice the normal distance
Correct Answer: D Twice the normal distance
Explanation: If you're travelling in heavy rain, you should be aware that it could take twice as long for you to stop as it would in dry weather. Increase your distance from the vehicle in front to allow for the longer stopping distance.
A Leave the motorway at the next exit
B Move into the lane on the right
C Switch on your dipped headlights
D Use the two-second rule
Correct Answer: C Switch on your dipped headlights
Explanation: If you're travelling on a motorway and your view ahead is poor, then you should reduce your speed. Leave at least four seconds between your vehicle and the one in front, and make sure that others can see you by using your dipped headlights.
A Your braking distance may be reduced
B Your engine may get flooded
C Your steering may become heavy
D Your tyres may lose grip
Correct Answer: D Your tyres may lose grip
Explanation: In very wet conditions, tyres may be unable to clear all the water from their path. This can result in a layer of water building up between the road and the tyre - a situation known as aquaplaning. To regain control, ease off the accelerator and, as the vehicle slows, the tyres should regain their grip. It's safer to reduce the risk of aquaplaning occurring by driving more slowly in very wet weather.
A Manhole covers will be slippery
B There'll be distracting bright reflections
C Visibility will be reduced by spray from traffic
D Your braking distances will be reduced
Correct Answer: C Visibility will be reduced by spray from traffic
Explanation: Other road users can be affected by the spray from large vehicles, severely reducing their vision. Always take care when you need to change lanes: signal in good time and watch your mirrors carefully before pulling out in these conditions.
A Drivers bunch together when it's raining
B Headlights will dazzle you more easily
C More spray will be thrown up
D Windscreen wipers obstruct your view
Correct Answer: C More spray will be thrown up
Explanation: Higher speeds will cause more spray to be thrown up by vehicles' tyres - particularly the tyres of larger vehicles and trailers. Always use dipped headlights in poor visibility caused by rain and spray.
A Get much closer before moving out
B Move out earlier than normal
C Wait for the lorry to slow down on a hill
D Wait until the other driver gives a left signal
Correct Answer: B Move out earlier than normal
Explanation: If you wish to overtake a vehicle that's throwing up spray, move out earlier than normal. This will help to limit the reduction in vision that the rear spray will cause before you pass.
A Their vision will be increased
B Their vision will be reduced
C They'll be able to overtake more easily
D They'll need to use intermittent wipers
Correct Answer: B Their vision will be reduced
Explanation: Spray-suppression equipment reduces the amount of spray thrown up to other road users. Check the equipment regularly to make sure it's secure and undamaged.
A To clear mud from the tyres on building sites
B To reduce spray on wet roads
C To remove objects from the tyre tread
D To stop snow building up behind the wheel
Correct Answer: B To reduce spray on wet roads
Explanation: The brushes are part of a spray-suppression system. They reduce the amount of water thrown up at the sides and rear of the vehicle. Check them regularly for security. If they become worn, make sure they're replaced.
A Before setting out on every journey
B Once per year before the MOT test
C Only as part of a pre-winter check
D Only when you'll be using a motorway
Correct Answer: A Before setting out on every journey
Explanation: You should always check all your spray-suppression equipment before a journey. Don't ignore it just because it's dry when you set out. The weather can change on the way.
A Catalytic converter
B Side-panel skirts
C Spray reducers
D Wind deflectors
Correct Answer: C Spray reducers
Explanation: Spray reducers or spray-suppression equipment are attachments fitted around the wheel arches of large vehicles. They effectively trap spray thrown up from the wheels, which would otherwise reduce visibility for other road users.
Correct Answer: B Rain
Explanation: The spray-suppression equipment helps to prevent water from being thrown up and causing reduced visibility, for you and other drivers. Driving at a reduced speed in wet conditions will also help to reduce the amount of water thrown up by your vehicle's tyres.
A As quickly as possible to cause the least delay
B At normal speed when you have spray reducers fitted
C Slowly, in a high gear, with engine speed low
D Slowly, in a low gear, with engine speed high
Correct Answer: D Slowly, in a low gear, with engine speed high
Explanation: It's important to use a low gear and keep the engine speed high to prevent water from entering the engine through the exhaust system. In these circumstances, it may be necessary to slip the clutch to keep the road speed as low as possible.
A It's illegal to overtake snow ploughs
B Snow ploughs are left-hand-drive only
C There may be deep snow ahead
D Your speed could cause snow to drift behind
Correct Answer: C There may be deep snow ahead
Explanation: There's no way of knowing how deep the snow could be ahead. If you overtake and then become stuck in the snow, you may cause problems for the snow plough, particularly if you block the road.
A To allow for an increased stopping distance
B To let other motorists move into the gap
C To prevent rain from entering the vehicle's braking system
D To reduce the risk of water spraying into the filters
Correct Answer: A To allow for an increased stopping distance
Explanation: Extra care is needed when driving in heavy rain. Reduce your speed and switch on dipped headlights. Tyres will have less grip on a wet road and it will take up to twice the distance to stop when compared with good dry conditions.
A To force other drivers to act properly and slow down
B To prevent water from entering the braking system
C To reduce the amount of spray thrown up
D To stop the electrics getting wet
Correct Answer: C To reduce the amount of spray thrown up
Explanation: Driving at high speed on a wet motorway can throw up dense spray, making it very difficult for other drivers to see ahead. Driving more slowly reduces the amount of spray and this makes it safer for other drivers.
A Only when the national speed limit applies
B Only when you're being followed closely by other traffic
C When visibility is more than 100 metres (328 feet)
D When visibility is reduced to 100 metres (328 feet) or less
Correct Answer: D When visibility is reduced to 100 metres (328 feet) or less
Explanation: Heavy rain and the resulting spray from large vehicles travelling at speed can seriously affect visibility on the motorway. Reduce your speed and use your headlights. Don't use high-intensity rear lights unless visibility is reduced to 100 metres (328 feet) or less.
A Braking gently and in good time
B Tyres becoming hotter in the bad weather
C Water entering the braking system
D Water reducing the tyres' grip on the road
Correct Answer: D Water reducing the tyres' grip on the road
Explanation: If a build-up of water prevents the tyres from gripping the road, the steering can become unresponsive. If this happens, ease off the accelerator and slow down gradually.
A It will be easier to change direction
B It will increase fuel consumption
C It will need more engine power
D It will take longer to stop
Correct Answer: D It will take longer to stop
Explanation: When driving downhill, gravity will cause the vehicle to increase speed. More braking effort will be required, and stopping distances will increase.
A Because there are no road markings
B Because they have priority
C To avoid splashing them
D To encourage them to cross
Correct Answer: C To avoid splashing them
Explanation: When the roads are wet, have consideration for pedestrians walking or standing near the kerb.
A You're likely to be distracted
B Your engine will overheat
C Your view ahead is reduced
D Your view to the rear is reduced
Correct Answer: C Your view ahead is reduced
Explanation: Tailgating is very dangerous because there isn't enough room to stop if an emergency arises. It's also intimidating for the driver that you're following.
A When one of your lights has failed
B When you need to reverse for some distance
C When you're on a motorway and traffic ahead slows suddenly
D When you've just overtaken another vehicle
Correct Answer: C When you're on a motorway and traffic ahead slows suddenly
Explanation: While moving, hazard warning lights may only be used on a motorway or unrestricted dual carriageway to warn drivers behind of a need to slow down, due to a hazard ahead.
A Children crossing the road
B Contraflow system
C Roadworks ahead
D Uneven road surface
Correct Answer: A Children crossing the road
Explanation: These lights warn that children are likely to be crossing the road on their way to and from school. Slow down and watch out for them.
A Near a fire station
B Near a school
C On approach to a level crossing
D On approach to a motorway
Correct Answer: B Near a school
Explanation: Flashing amber lights are found near schools. They warn you that children are likely to be crossing the road on their way to and from school. Drive slowly until you're clear of the area.
A It takes longer to stop
B It's more difficult to keep to speed limits
C There'll be an increase in traffic
D You'll have reduced visibility
Correct Answer: D You'll have reduced visibility
Explanation: You must be able to stop safely in the distance that you can see to be clear ahead. This will be the distance illuminated by your headlights or by street lights and will generally be less than you can see in daylight.
A Every driver will normally be tired
B Large vehicles are subject to a 10% speed reduction
C Most towns aren't adequately lit
D Speed and distance are harder to judge
Correct Answer: D Speed and distance are harder to judge
Explanation: In the darkness, it will be difficult to assess the road ahead - especially if there are bends or hills, which may prevent you from seeing oncoming vehicles.
Correct Answer: B The left-hand lane
Explanation: The red studs on your left indicate the edge of the hard shoulder, while the white studs are used between the lanes. Using more than one reference point will help you to be certain of your position.
A Traffic ahead moving into the right-hand lane
B Traffic behind in the right-hand lane, returning to the middle lane
C Traffic behind that's trying to pass on your left
D Traffic that's intending to leave at the next exit
Correct Answer: B Traffic behind in the right-hand lane, returning to the middle lane
Explanation: Traffic behind that's returning from the right-hand lane is a hazard to be aware of before you move into the middle lane to overtake. Checking your blind spot can help you see these vehicles before you commit to changing lanes.
A Change to a lower gear
B Check your mirrors carefully
C Increase your speed gently
D Look over your left shoulder
Correct Answer: B Check your mirrors carefully
Explanation: Check your mirrors to make sure that it's safe to overtake. Remember that traffic coming up behind will be travelling at a faster speed.
A Any lane
B The left-hand lane
C The middle lane
D The right-hand lane
Correct Answer: B The left-hand lane
Explanation: You should remain in the left-hand lane unless you're overtaking other vehicles. Don't be inconsiderate and stay in the centre lane or other overtaking lanes when you've finished overtaking.
A Be ready to adjust your speed
B Leave the other vehicle to adjust its speed
C Stay at the maximum speed allowed for your vehicle
D Try to race and get ahead of it
Correct Answer: A Be ready to adjust your speed
Explanation: It's not always possible for drivers in the left-hand lane to change lanes to let joining traffic merge. However, you should be ready to adjust your speed to help the joining driver merge safely.
A Brake heavily and let them merge
B Expect them to stop and let you pass
C Move to the next lane if it's safe
D Try to accelerate past them
Correct Answer: C Move to the next lane if it's safe
Explanation: Only change lanes if doing so won't inconvenience another road user. Merging drivers have a responsibility to give way, if necessary, and not force their way onto the main carriageway. Planning ahead will ensure you're prepared to deal with these situations.
A The bridge height clearance will be less in the centre lane
B The centre lane is narrower than the left-hand lane
C The reflective studs may be missing in the centre lane
D Traffic in the centre lane may be travelling much faster than you
Correct Answer: D Traffic in the centre lane may be travelling much faster than you
Explanation: Always indicate your intentions in good time; this will allow others time to alter their speed and course if necessary. Always check your blind spots before changing lanes.
A When other vehicles are turning right
B When the motorway has three lanes
C When the motorway has two lanes
D When vehicles are stopped on the hard shoulder
Correct Answer: C When the motorway has two lanes
Explanation: Goods and passenger vehicles with a MAM of more than 7.5 tonnes, those required to be fitted with a speed limiter, and vehicles towing trailers must not use the right-hand lane on a motorway with more than two lanes, unless there are exceptional circumstances.
A Changing gear
B Cutting in
C Increasing your speed
D Signalling
Correct Answer: B Cutting in
Explanation: After overtaking, check your nearside mirror carefully before moving back to the left. Don't rely on the other driver flashing their headlights, because only you can make the decision that it's safe.
A To enable emergency vehicles to get quickly to the scene of an incident
B To enable large vehicles to park out of the way
C To enable other traffic to overtake on the nearside
D To enable slow-moving traffic to move further over to the left on uphill gradients
Correct Answer: D To enable slow-moving traffic to move further over to the left on uphill gradients
Explanation: On a motorway where there's a long uphill gradient, there may be a crawler lane. This helps the traffic to flow by making an extra lane available on the left for slower, heavy vehicles.
A You're approaching a 'lorries only' lane
B You're approaching a long downhill slope
C You're approaching a long uphill slope
D You're approaching a service area
Correct Answer: C You're approaching a long uphill slope
Explanation: The term 'crawler lane' doesn't mean the lane is only for extremely slow vehicles. It's advising you of an extra lane on the left. Crawler lanes are usually built on sections of road where the length of the gradient is such that some large vehicles will be slowed to the point where they become a hazard for other road users.
A When letting faster traffic overtake you
B When parking to have a rest
C When slowing down for a motorway exit
D When turning right from a major road
Correct Answer: A When letting faster traffic overtake you
Explanation: Many vehicles are very powerful and can maintain speed even when climbing a gradient. Even if your vehicle is capable of maintaining speed, you can still use the crawler lane to make it easier for other road users to overtake safely.
A Drive very close to the vehicle in front
B Flash your headlights at oncoming traffic
C Look ahead for road junctions
D Make a final check in your left-hand mirror
Correct Answer: C Look ahead for road junctions
Explanation: Before overtaking, you need to make sure it's safe to carry out the manoeuvre. As part of your check, look well ahead for road junctions. You shouldn't overtake as you approach a road junction, because if a vehicle emerges, or has to wait to turn, you could risk a collision.
A When the speed limit has been reduced
B When you would have to break the speed limit
C When you're approaching motorway slip roads
D When your view of the road ahead is clear
Correct Answer: B When you would have to break the speed limit
Explanation: Never commit yourself to overtaking unless you're absolutely certain that you have the time and space to complete the manoeuvre safely. Don't take any risks that will endanger other road users.
A By checking your nearside mirror
B By moving to the nearside, hoping the other vehicle will slow down
C By using your hazard warning lights as a signal
D By waiting for the driver you've overtaken to flash their headlights
Correct Answer: A By checking your nearside mirror
Explanation: While overtaking, you'll need to judge carefully when to return to the nearside lane. Check your left-hand (nearside) mirror to make sure the rear of your vehicle is well clear. You should allow for the length of both vehicles and take into account the speed difference. Don't cut in too soon on the vehicle you've overtaken, and don't rely on signals from other drivers; they may be signalling to someone else.
A Move up closer to the slower vehicle
B Signal left while waiting for the car to pass
C Signal right and move out
D Stay behind the slower vehicle
Correct Answer: D Stay behind the slower vehicle
Explanation: You should allow the faster-moving vehicle to overtake safely. If you pull out to overtake at this time, you'll cause the car behind to brake sharply. Don't use the size of your vehicle to intimidate. Be professional and show consideration to other road users.
A Indicate left, then right
B Move back to the left when it's safe to do so
C Switch your rear lights on and off
D Wait for the other driver to flash their headlights
Correct Answer: B Move back to the left when it's safe to do so
Explanation: Signal if necessary and move back to the left as soon as it's safe to do so. Don't drive for long distances in the centre or right-hand lane unnecessarily.
A Give a right signal after entering the roundabout
B Give no signal on approach
C Signal left on approach
D Signal right on approach
Correct Answer: D Signal right on approach
Explanation: There are times when, due to the size of your vehicle, you'll have to take up part of another lane. If you need to do this, make sure that you use effective observation all around. Be aware that other road users might not understand the reasons for your position on the road. You should signal your intentions and take up your position in good time.
A When coming to contraflow systems
B When driving on motorways
C When they need to avoid braking sharply
D When they need to avoid mounting the kerb
Correct Answer: D When they need to avoid mounting the kerb
Explanation: When you have to straddle the lanes at small roundabouts or junctions, always signal in good time. Be alert for inexperienced road users who may, without realising, put themselves into a dangerous position.
A Check your mirrors
B Flash your headlights
C Select a higher gear
D Use your endurance brake
Correct Answer: A Check your mirrors
Explanation: Before changing direction, you should check your mirrors for any vehicles that may be overtaking. An overtaking driver or rider might not have seen the narrowing road ahead. You should let them get past before you move across to the right.
A Allow extra room
B Keep close as you pass
C Overtake slowly
D Sound your horn as you pass
Correct Answer: A Allow extra room
Explanation: Cyclists and motorcyclists may become unbalanced by your vehicle passing too close. Plan ahead and give them plenty of room. Remember that your large vehicle can cause a vacuum, which will suck the rider towards it. The noise and close proximity of your vehicle can also startle them, and could cause them to swerve suddenly.
Correct Answer: A Go in any direction
Explanation: When following cyclists onto a roundabout, be aware that they might not take the exit you expect them to. Cyclists approaching in the left-hand lane may be turning right. They may not have been able to get into the correct lane due to heavy traffic, so give them room.
A Change quickly to a higher gear
B Check your position in the left-hand mirror
C Close right up before pulling out
D Look well ahead for uphill gradients
Correct Answer: D Look well ahead for uphill gradients
Explanation: Plan your overtaking carefully. The weight of your vehicle, combined with the restrictions imposed by a speed limiter, is likely to make your vehicle lose speed on uphill gradients. You should take this into consideration before attempting to overtake another moving vehicle.
A They may accelerate briskly in front of you
B They may be moving faster than you
C They may cut in sharply behind you
D They may move back to the middle lane as you move out
Correct Answer: D They may move back to the middle lane as you move out
Explanation: Vehicles overtaking in the right-hand lane may return to the centre lane when they've finished their manoeuvre. You should look for this before starting to pull out. Don't rely on the size of your vehicle to claim right of way.
A It's ahead of you and braking
B It's facing towards you
C It's moving away from you
D It's stationary and facing away from you
Correct Answer: B It's facing towards you
Explanation: At night, you can tell whether a vehicle is facing towards or away from you by the colour of its lights. Additionally, its brake lights or indicators can give you information about its direction and intentions. This information helps you to make safe driving decisions.
A So that other road users can see the size of your vehicle
B So that the intensity of street lighting can be reduced
C To allow following drivers to use dipped headlights
D To prevent the battery from overcharging
Correct Answer: A So that other road users can see the size of your vehicle
Explanation: As well as headlights and tail lights, large vehicles have additional lighting to help other road users see the size of the vehicle. All lights should be clean and working properly. Driving at night when your vehicle is poorly lit is dangerous for you and other road users.
A When visibility falls below 100 metres (328 feet)
B When visibility falls below 200 metres (656 feet)
C When visibility falls below 300 metres (984 feet)
D When visibility falls below 400 metres (1312 feet)
Correct Answer: A When visibility falls below 100 metres (328 feet)
Explanation: In dense fog, large vehicles are no more visible than any other. If visibility falls below 100 metres (328 feet), use your fog lights to help other drivers see you.
A When visibility is more than 10 metres (32 feet)
B When visibility is more than 100 metres (328 feet)
C When visibility is more than 50 metres (164 feet)
D When visibility is more than 75 metres (246 feet)
Correct Answer: B When visibility is more than 100 metres (328 feet)
Explanation: Switch off your fog lights when fog starts to clear and visibility improves to more than 100 metres (328 feet). Don't leave your fog lights on when the fog has cleared, because they can cause unnecessary glare or distraction for other drivers.
A When it's raining and the roads are wet
B When the roads are dry
C When the roads are icy
D When you're driving in fog
Correct Answer: B When the roads are dry
Explanation: In good dry conditions, you should leave a two-second gap between your vehicle and the one ahead. When the weather is bad, you'll have to keep a greater distance, because it will take you longer to stop. In wet weather it will take up to twice the distance; in icy weather this could increase to ten times as far.
A Briskly accelerate away from the vehicle behind
B Increase your distance from the vehicle in front
C Switch your rear fog lamps on and off
D Touch the brake pedal sharply to show your brake lights
Correct Answer: B Increase your distance from the vehicle in front
Explanation: The faster the traffic is moving, the greater the distance that needs to be kept between vehicles to maintain safety margins. If you find another vehicle driving too close behind you, gradually reduce your speed to increase your distance from the vehicle in front. You'll then be able to brake more gently when you need to, reducing the likelihood of the lorry behind running into the back of your vehicle.
A Flash your headlights
B Overtake when you can
C Slow down
D Stay close behind
Correct Answer: C Slow down
Explanation: Always maintain a safe following distance from the vehicle in front. If another vehicle pulls into the gap, slow down to re-establish a safe following distance. Following too close is dangerous and places you and other road users in unnecessary danger; your view of the road ahead will be seriously reduced, and you won't be able to see or plan effectively.
A At least a one-second gap
B At least a two-second gap
C One vehicle length
D Two vehicle lengths
Correct Answer: B At least a two-second gap
Explanation: Tailgating' - travelling too close to the vehicle in front - is very dangerous, because it doesn't give you enough distance to stop safely. Leave at least a two-second gap in good conditions, and increase this to four seconds in wet weather.
A Drop further back
B Move over to the left
C Move over to the right
D Overtake as soon as you can
Correct Answer: A Drop further back
Explanation: Staying well behind the vehicle in front will improve your view of the road ahead. This will give you more time and room to react to hazards. Use the two-second rule to make sure you're not too close. Don't move out to the right, as this could put you into the path of an oncoming vehicle or obstruct smaller vehicles that wish to overtake.
A The road's well lit
B There's an overtaking lane
C You can see well ahead
D You're outside a built-up area
Correct Answer: C You can see well ahead
Explanation: It's more difficult to judge speed and distance accurately in the dark. Darkness can also hide bends and dips in the road. Plan ahead, and be sure that you have time and space to complete your overtaking safely.
A Five times as long
B Four times as long
C Ten times as long
D Twice as long
Correct Answer: C Ten times as long
Explanation: In icy or snowy weather, your stopping distance can increase by up to ten times. Because snowy weather increases the distance needed to stop, you must look further ahead and leave an increased safety margin.
A Always use the retarder
B Brake gently and in good time
C Change down through the gears
D Use the parking brake in a rapid on-and-off movement
Correct Answer: B Brake gently and in good time
Explanation: When you have to slow down or stop, you should always avoid harsh, late braking. This is particularly important on icy or slippery roads, where you need to brake gently and in good time to make sure you keep control of your vehicle.
A After using the gears first
B By pumping the brake pedal
C Gently
D Suddenly
Correct Answer: C Gently
Explanation: In poor conditions, all braking should be controlled, in good time and when travelling in a straight line. Try to avoid braking and turning at the same time. Look well ahead to assess and plan your actions.
A To keep a safe distance from the vehicle in front in queuing traffic
B To keep a safe distance from the vehicle in front when conditions are good
C To keep a safe distance from the vehicle in front when it's icy
D To keep a safe distance from the vehicle in front when it's raining
Correct Answer: B To keep a safe distance from the vehicle in front when conditions are good
Explanation: Use the two-second rule when conditions are good and you're driving on roads carrying faster-moving traffic. Choose a fixed reference point, and when the vehicle ahead passes that point say to yourself 'Only a fool breaks the two-second rule.' If you reach the object before you finish saying this, you're too close and you need to drop back and check again.
A Your brakes will overheat
B Your cab will fill with fumes
C Your engine will overheat
D Your field of vision will be seriously reduced
Correct Answer: D Your field of vision will be seriously reduced
Explanation: Staying back will increase your view of the road ahead. This will help you to see any hazards that might occur and will allow you more time to react. It will also allow the driver in front to see you in their mirrors.
A At least four seconds
B At least one second
C At least three seconds
D At least two seconds
Correct Answer: A At least four seconds
Explanation: Wet roads will increase the time it takes you to stop. Four seconds is the minimum gap you should leave on wet roads. This is double the gap you should normally keep from the vehicle in front on good, dry roads.
A Brake in good time
B Stay in the left-hand lane
C Stop before emerging
D Use the handbrake
Correct Answer: A Brake in good time
Explanation: The entrances to roundabouts are often worn. This can make the surface slippery, especially when it's wet. You should plan your approach and brake in good time.
A Make sure that all spray-suppression equipment is working
B Make sure that the gear lever is in neutral
C Make sure that there's no mist on your rear-view mirrors
D Make sure that your vehicle is travelling in a straight line
Correct Answer: D Make sure that your vehicle is travelling in a straight line
Explanation: If you need to brake when the road surface is wet, do so while your vehicle is travelling in a straight line. This will reduce the risk of skidding. As a professional driver, you should routinely brake in good time, so that you don't brake and change direction at the same time.
A The weight of the load will help you go faster
B You'll be able to get past more quickly
C You'll need to use a high gear
D You'll take longer to get past
Correct Answer: D You'll take longer to get past
Explanation: Always plan well ahead before overtaking. Take into consideration the size of your vehicle and whether there's a gradient ahead. The load on your vehicle will slow you down on an uphill gradient. It may be better to wait until you're on the level before trying to overtake.
A A motorcycle
B A road tanker
C A sports car
D A taxi
Correct Answer: A A motorcycle
Explanation: Motorcycles can be very vulnerable to strong side wind. Allow extra room when overtaking them in windy weather. Check your nearside mirror while alongside and before moving back to the left.
A At least 23 metres (75 feet)
B At least 36 metres (118 feet)
C At least 53 metres (175 feet)
D At least 73 metres (240 feet)
Correct Answer: C At least 53 metres (175 feet)
Explanation: You should always leave a safety margin between your vehicle and the one in front. This gap will give you a better view of the road ahead. It will also allow you time to react if the traffic in front changes speed or direction.
A Keep a two-second gap
B Reduce your separation distance
C Remove spray-suppression equipment
D Use dipped headlights
Correct Answer: D Use dipped headlights
Explanation: When visibility is poor or the road is wet, leave a greater separation distance - at least a four-second time gap from the vehicle in front. You should also reduce speed and use dipped headlights.
A In hot weather, the bridges might be closed to heavy traffic
B Rain can make crossing bridges very difficult for buses and coaches
C Some roads may be closed to certain vehicles in high winds
D You won't be able to climb the bridges if it's frosty
Correct Answer: C Some roads may be closed to certain vehicles in high winds
Explanation: Some exposed places are frequently subject to high winds. These include high-level bridges and roads, viaducts and some motorways. Check the weather forecast and plan an alternative route. Remember, you're responsible for your passengers' safety. Don't ignore warnings of severe winds.
A Buffeting will be reduced
B Exhaust fumes are more toxic when it's raining
C Noise from your engine will be louder
D Spray could affect their control
Correct Answer: D Spray could affect their control
Explanation: When passing other road users - especially motorcyclists and cyclists - in wet weather, the spray from your vehicle could affect their control. Leave plenty of room as you pass, and look in your left-hand mirror to check that they're still in control.
A Steering will be easier
B Steering will be more difficult
C Your stopping distances will be greater
D Your stopping distances will be reduced
Correct Answer: B Steering will be more difficult
Explanation: Be alert for places where the road is shielded from the wind. When you leave this shelter, the wind may suddenly blow you off course, making steering more difficult.
A Dense spray
B Heavy rain
C Strong wind
D Thick fog
Correct Answer: C Strong wind
Explanation: If you're driving a double-deck bus, you'll feel the effect of the wind more than you would on a single-deck vehicle. This is because the vehicle's height increases the surface area that can be affected by the wind.
A Move back early to protect them from buffeting
B Pass close to shield them from the wind
C Pass wide in case they're blown off course
D Signal left so they know you're pulling in
Correct Answer: C Pass wide in case they're blown off course
Explanation: In strong wind, motorcyclists can be blown off course. Allow them plenty of room when you're overtaking, in case they're blown into your path.
Correct Answer: C Rain
Explanation: If there's heavy rain, the spray-suppression equipment fitted to your vehicle will protect other road users from loss of vision when following or passing your vehicle. Check the wheel arches to make sure the fitments haven't worked loose and no parts have broken off. Well-maintained equipment will force the spray back down onto the road, instead of out to the rear and the sides of the vehicle.
A On all bends and corners
B On the approach to all roundabouts
C Only when joining a bus lane
D To avoid mounting the kerb
Correct Answer: D To avoid mounting the kerb
Explanation: There may be times when you have to take up part of another lane in order to make a turn or manoeuvre. Use your mirrors and check for other traffic that might try to move into the gap you've left to make your turn. Signal and take up your position in good time.
A They must leave all the interior lights switched on
B They must leave their parking lights switched on
C They must park under street lights
D They must park within 25 metres (82 feet) of a street light
Correct Answer: B They must leave their parking lights switched on
Explanation: All buses and coaches and most minibuses - depending on their weight - must have their parking lights switched on when they're parked on the road at night. Make sure that all your lights are clean and working properly.
A It's harder to concentrate
B It's harder to keep control in the dark
C There may be unseen dips or bends in the road
D You may dazzle other drivers
Correct Answer: C There may be unseen dips or bends in the road
Explanation: On unlit roads, it's more difficult to see bends, junctions or dips ahead. This could prevent you from seeing oncoming traffic, pedestrians or cyclists. Unless the road is well lit or you're on a dual carriageway, ask yourself whether overtaking is absolutely necessary.
A To help any passengers getting on or off
B To help the driver when reversing
C To make them easier to overtake
D To make them easier to see at junctions
Correct Answer: D To make them easier to see at junctions
Explanation: Newer buses and coaches have marker lights along the side; these ensure that they're visible as they emerge at junctions, roundabouts and in other situations. If your vehicle has marker lights fitted, they must all be clean and working.
A In a crawler lane
B In a narrow street
C On a hump bridge
D On a left-hand bend
Correct Answer: C On a hump bridge
Explanation: You must be aware of the risk of grounding; for example, on a hump bridge. Look ahead for advance warning signs. If you decide to divert to avoid the hazard, make sure your new route doesn't also have a restriction that would be impassable for your vehicle.